The Importance of Being Correctly Diagnosed

Being diagnosed with a certain condition means that your treatment program will then follow the prescribed path for that particular illness or disorder. Which is why it is vital that adults and children are correctly diagnosed in the first place. Auditory Processing Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder are two very different conditions, but they are both relatively new medical problems and thus suffer from a lack of clear community understanding as to their natures. Both complaints affect children disproportionately when compared to the number of recognised adult cases. Doctors have had difficulty in coming to terms with these modern ailments and could well be accused of dragging the chain to some degree.

The Importance of Being Correctly Diagnosed

Sophisticated medicine for children, which treats behavioural problems is a relatively new phenomenon. Until quite recently, young people were left to their own devices and their treatment not taken seriously until they had reached adulthood. Paediatricians were, in the main, a slightly neglected body of medical practitioners who did not capture the imagination of the general public. As western communities have become more and more wealthy greater attention has begun to be focused on younger members of our populations.

A parent driven movement for the medical recognition of conditions like ADHD and Auditory Processing Disorder became more and more strident in its demands for airtime. Parents with kids who were not conforming to behavioural standards wanted answers and they wanted pharmaceutical solutions to the problem. ADHD testing, started to become more prevalent in America, the United Kingdom and Australia. People wanted their children diagnosed with medically recognised conditions. Doctors were asking themselves and their colleagues, had these conditions always existed unrecognised or were they a brand new phenomenon, and if so what has caused them?

Are these modern ailments occurring in response or reaction to our rapidly changing worlds in the west? Are they related to diet, the vastly increased prevalence of fast foods, fats and sugars? Is the inability to focus being exacerbated by the demands of a highly conceptual digital age? Has the classroom become too intellectually demanding for many of our children? Is the sedentary behaviour and lack of exercise damaging the health of our children? Is it pollution, bad medicines, or are electro-magnetic energy affecting brainwaves? Is there just too much information floating around us in the biosphere and are some of us struggling to process it? Lots of questions that need to be asked, and, hopefully, answered. Until then, the importance of correct diagnosis and treatment of these conditions remains a priority at the coalface.